The pitfalls of flexible working and how to avoid them

The pitfalls of flexible working

The world is changing too fast to think you’ll be working in the same role for long and the notion of a career for life is rapidly becoming a thing of the past. One estimate suggests that 65% of children starting primary school today will end up working in jobs that currently don’t even exist. In addition to the changes affecting permanent employment, freelancing is on the increase as people opt for a more flexible working lifestyle and swap the morning commute for a desk at home or a local coffee shop.

On a day to day basis, those working in conventional 9 to 5 jobs are also experiencing a shift in working style as flexible working, part-time hours, working from home and hot-desking (hot-desking policies often driven by cutting overheads as flexible working and an increasing part-time workforce means less desk space is needed) are becoming increasingly common.

We no longer need to meet people face-to-face in real life to get work done. Technology is a massive enabler to remote working for full-time employees and freelancers, for example, there’s plenty of free video conferencing options to choose from as well as sites like Fiver springing up where freelancers can get paid their expertise from anywhere and to anywhere in the world.

There’s a ton of benefits of working at any time from anywhere to freelancers, business owners and employers, but like any new system or way of working there are realities that get overlooked. For example;

It can be lonely working from home. I know this from personal experience.  When I first went from working in an office to working at home it hit me. I really missed my colleagues. I missed being able to bounce ideas and sense check things with them. If you work from home you must be able to deal with being on your own for long periods of time and if you are an employer you have a duty of care to staff to make sure they can manage the isolation of working from home.

Stress levels are rising as flexible working means we don’t switch off from work. We constantly check our phones, answer our emails and update our social media. This constant ‘being on’ is not good for our physical or mental health.

Hot-desking increases germs and illness in the office. According to the reputable publication, The Sun Your desk could be harbouring 400 times more germs than a toilet seat”. Sensationalist perhaps, but the incidence of germs spread around the office is greater when you are hot-desking and using different computers than when you keep your germs to themselves at your own desk.  

Your employees might object. I’m an advocate of hot-desking to create the water-cooler moments that spark innovation and creativity. However, water cooler moments rely on people speaking to each other. When people resent being told to hot-desk they often withdraw and don’t interact with their new colleagues around them. If a hot-desking policy isn’t implemented with an understanding of the current culture and care isn’t taken to involve employees from the start of the process, you can end up with a culture clash that causes so much disruption and upset it can do more harm than good.

There are solutions

If you work from home schedule your day carefully to ensure you do have conversations with other people, build a support network so you do have people to bounce ideas with, for example, join a mastermind group or get a mentor.

Put systems in place to not check your phone at all hours of the day and night and turn off notifications outside of working hours.

If you work in an organisation get some cleaning cloths (or ask your employer to provide them) for the keyboard and desk to stop the spread of germs.

If you are implementing a hot-desking or working from home policy carefully consult with employees and consider the culture shift required to make it work before piling in.

This changing face of work is one of the reasons that I’ve up the Lucidity Network  – whether you work for yourself or in an organisation it’s a ready-made professional support network that combines a mix of face-to-face meet-ups, online toolkits and connections to an energizing community that accelerates your progress so that you get the results you want.

Sign up to the waiting list to be the first to know when the Network is open for new members. In the meantime you can join the Lucidity Community free Facebook group  for clearer thinking and better results.  

Running a home business on a hectic schedule

Running a home business

A guest blog from Eva Benoit.

There are a lot of reasons you may not be able to run your home business on a regular 9-to-5 schedule. Perhaps you are in school and you have a great idea that you can only capitalize on once you graduate. Or, maybe you’re nursing an infant at home and your schedule is their out-of-whack sleep schedule.

Whatever your reason to work outside the normal full-time parameters, it’s not impossible to do so. You can make your not 9-5  home-based business work with these helpful tips.

Your own space

The one thing every person trying to run a home business needs is a designated workspace where they can get what needs to be done without distractions. You may not have a whole room available for an office, but at the very least you need a corner or a desk where you can file necessary papers, set up your computer, and have a home base for whatever it is you need to run your business. Optimizing said workspace for productivity ensures you make the most of what limited hours you can work in your bonkers schedule.

Lighting is important; as light synchronizes your circadian rhythm. You can use artificial light to help your body switch into productivity mode even if you’re working the night shift. If you really have a hard time staying awake and motivated, consider light therapy.  It can be helpful in the winter when symptoms of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) can rear their ugly heads.

Other ways to optimize a home workspace:

  • Add some life to the area! Houseplants and fish tanks can help people think in a more creative manner. They may also improve performance, ease anxiety and aid in your ability to focus on your work.
  • Use color psychology to curate a workspace that motivates in the specific way you need.  For instance, those who find themselves needing a pick-me-up when it’s time to work can benefit from energizing shades of orange and red in their office. Those who thrive in a practical and ordered environment can work with neutral tones that emit cleanliness, stability, and practicality.
  • KISS- Keep it simple, stupid! Having too much clutter in your workspace is a huge bane to productivity. Embrace minimalism and learn to stay organized from the get-go so you don’t have to waste time on major clean-out and reorganization projects.

Save money wherever you can

Funds mean flexibility. Cut costs wherever you can and pocket those savings into an emergency fund, making sure you have something to fall back on if you have to take a hiatus or you fall behind because of your crazy schedule. Instead of embracing a “spend money to make money mentality,” use these helpful tips to pinch pennies:

  • When outfitting your office, buy furniture used. Look for deals through newspaper ads, bankruptcy sales, Craigslist and surplus offices at nearby schools.
  • Connect with other home-based business owners to pool your purchasing power. You can save major moolah when you buy in bulk. However, when it’s just you on the team, you don’t really need 100 boxes of printer paper for the month. When you split the costs and products between multiple business owners, it makes more sense while saving your pennies.
  • Work with local suppliers. Not only will you save on shipping if you pick things up yourself, but you establish real relationships with people that can make a difference in your professional success. Their connections and word-of-mouth endorsements are worth more than anything some marketing agency can do.

No more excuses! You can start the business of your dreams despite your crazy schedule. Establishing a designated space for work helps shift your mindset to work mode. You can increase productivity even in your wonky hours with lighting, color, houseplants and minimalist decor. When you save money at every corner, you can turn those savings into a safety net for your business. Buy used, pool your purchasing power and shop local to save big all the while making valuable connections.

Eva Benoit specializes in helping professionals with stress and anxiety, but welcomes working with people from all walks of life, visit her site.

If you’re thinking about setting up from home you might also benefit from the Lucidity Network – a pick and mix of online and offline practical tools and advice as well as access to a dynamic network of expertise. We have designed the Lucidity Network to help you take the lead in getting the results that you want. We’re open for new members a few times a year. Sign up to the waiting list to be the first to know when the Network is open for new members. In the meantime you can join the Lucidity Community free Facebook group  for clearer thinking and better results.